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geofencing smart cities

September 22, 2016

Topic: Research

Geofencing, smart cities shaping citizen involvement

Location-based, context-aware notification systems enabled by geofencing offer a new way to connect citizens with proximate opportunities for engaging in collaborative policymaking. Thore Fechner, Dominik Schlarmann, and Christian Kray explore the potential of location-based technology for motivating citizen engagement.

Fechner, Schlarmann, and Kray published ‘Facilitating Citizen Engagement in Situ: Assessing the Impact of Pro-Active Geofenced Notifications’ as part of the Proceedings of MobileHCI’16, the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services. Acknowledging the role of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in the enablement of Open Government and Smart City programs, the research identifies of communication enabled by location-based technology.

The research understands that spatial vicinity is a major factor in shaping citizen involvement with processes and policy. Fechner, Schlarmann, and Kray leverage geofencing and proactive notifications on mobile devices to connect citizens with engagement opportunities in their locational vicinity, also drawing on the existing uses of location based services in e-commerce, tourism, and situated storytelling in local heritage awareness initiatives.

The study reports the development of a notification app for smartphones that offers information on engagement opportunities located near the user. The app enables virtual spatial barriers, or geofences, which allows citizens to be notified of the opportunity in their spatial context, for example, a meeting or a contested area. The notification service can also be customized to cater to specific categories such as culture or sustainability, as well as spatial specifications so that users may choose to receive notifications in select areas of their city. Reporting on field and lab based studies, the research offers insights into the applicability, motivational aspects, usage patterns, and pragmatic qualities of the app – and reflects on the outcomes and limitations highlighted by the evaluation.

Photo: US Fleet Tracking/Vimeo/cc

Facebook tokenistic in engagement impact for asylum seekers

September 21, 2016

Topic: Research

Facebook tokenistic in engagement impact for aslyum seekers

Fiona H. McKay and Matthew Dunn examine digital participation and advocacy on asylum seeker issues in Australia.

McKay and Dunn recently published ‘Can online participation on issues of asylum seeking lead to action? Understanding the intent to act’ in the Australian Journal of Psychology. Their research attempts to understand individual participation and willingness to advocate on issues of refuge and asylum seeking. It locates individual participation within a broader discourse that is often contested and controversial.

The study employs an online survey to examine the activities and perspectives of digital participants or subscribers of an asylum seeker support organisation’s Facebook page and newsletter. The survey included 1,688 newsletter subscribers and 2,416 people who ‘liked’ the organisation’s Facebook page. A majority of the respondents were tertiary educated women from Victoria.  

As indicated by the study, respondents who had ‘liked’ the Facebook page were primarily Internet-based in their engagement on asylum seeker issues. The findings suggest that engagement tends to be tokenistic when the cost of engaging action is less. McKay and Dunn present their interpretations of these findings and recommend that organisations find impactful ways to engage such stakeholders.

Fiona H. McKay is a Lecturer in the School of Health and Social Development, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia, with research interests in refugee and asylum seeker health and policy. Matthew Dunn is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Health and Social Development, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, with a diverse range of interests that include sports medicine, drug studies, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.        

Twitter: Fiona H. McKay @feemck  Matthew Dunn @drmdunn1

Photo: Mark Riboldi/Flickr/cc

public engagement and transportation services in Illinois

September 20, 2016

Topic: Research

Public engagement and transportation services in Illinois

By improving public engagement and transportation services, the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) address barriers to participation and inclusivity in engagement initiatives. IDOT recently commissioned a report by researchers at the University of Illinois, Chicago, to improve and expand the agency’s public engagement practices. ‘Recommendations to Enhance Quality Engagement’, serves as a roadmap to help IDOT grow and nurture its public outreach initiatives, particularly with disadvantaged and underserved communities.

Managed by the Institute for Policy and Civic Engagement and Urban Transportation Center, the research offers a theoretical and practical guidance on public participation in the context of transportation. The study found engagement expertise to be unevenly distributed across the agency, along with a prevalence of traditional engagement techniques. In creating the recommendations, the research leverages the IAP2 Spectrum of Public Participation, as well as case studies of impactful public engagement projects in four state transportation departments, a regional planning agency, and community college.

It also provides a background to the advantages and legal implications of engagement, examining barriers to participation and considerations for including disadvantaged communities in engagement initiatives. The study offers eight major recommendations: 1) Know Your Audience, 2) Use Existing Community Resources, 3) Perform Informal Outreach and Use Nontraditional Locations, 4) Match Engagement Technique with Goal and Context, 5) Enhance Staff Capabilities through Training, 6) Build Institutional Memory through Knowledge Management, 7) Measure and Assess, and 8) Use Technology to Enhance and Complement Outreach.

Photo: Steven Vance/Flickr/cc

 

interactive governance critical perspectives

September 14, 2016

Topic: Research

Interactive governance: critical perspectives

Jurian Edelenbos and Ingmar van Meerkerk compile critical perspectives of interactive governance in the recent publication, Critical Reflections on Interactive Governance: Self-organization and Participation in Public Governance. Edelenbos and van Meerkerk bring together eminent scholars from diverse disciplines to critically examine issues within and around interactive governance.

Critical Reflections offers a comprehensive overview of societies shift toward ‘smaller government’ and actionable insights into its theories, concepts, potential and limitations. The authors assess how civic engagement, self-organization and participation are shaped by interactive governance in contemporary sociopolitical contexts.

As a resource for scholars of public administration, political science and sociology and management, this volume explores a number of key debates around interactive governance, including effects of political leadership, the effectiveness and inclusiveness of government strategies, compatible leadership types, and collaborative relationships between citizens, government and civic organizations. Through the Edelenbos and van Meerkerk present an empirical, critical exploration of the concept of interative governance to arrive at the potential of hybrid arrangements for citizens, institutions and organizations.

Academic Director of the Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies, Jurian Edelenbos is also Professor of Public Administration, in the area of Water Governance, Department of Public Administration (Faculty of Social Sciences), Erasmus University Rotterdam. Ingmar van Meerkerk is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Department of Public Administration, also at Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Photo: gavilla/Pixabay/cc

citizen participation emergency management

September 13, 2016

Topic: Research

Citizen participation in Emergency Management

Technology-mediated participation in Emergency Management (EM) can identify how citizens contribute to disaster management. In ‘Coproduction as an Approach to Technology-Mediated Citizen Participation in Emergency Management’researchers Paloma Diaz, John M. Carroll and Ignacio Aedo illustrate uses of technology to integrate citizen skills and discuss social and mobile computing in participatory EM processes.

Published in Future Internet,  Diaz, Carroll and Aedo explore the role of technology in collaborations between EM organisations and communities. They further examine how digital technologies build meaningful partnerships through the alignment of safety protocols and community capabilities. Through case study analysis they demonstrate participatory design that brings emergency management professionals and decision-makers together to understand the constraints of technological solutions, citizen competencies and operation protocols.

In their survey, the authors explore how digital technologies create opportunities for leveraging citizen knowledge and social capital. Increased participation enables citizens as informants and responders, thus contributing to community resilience and security. Effective participation in this context would require collaboration between EM organisations and communities to build a meaningful partnership through the alignment of safety protocols and community capabilities.  

The research acknowledges that technologies for effective emergency management collaboration are sociotechnical systems, built around structures and behaviors. Technology that connects communities to EM organizations should be informed by a close understanding of the specific skills that citizens bring to the table and how these capabilities are aligned to the needs of the EM organizations. The authors explore a 2011 study conducted by the City of Richmond and Simon Fraser University, on the challenges  faced by EM professionals in British Columbia and Washington State in integrating social computing with their working protocols. They also examine a questionnaire-based 2013 study of technology-mediated participation involving Spanish emergency organizations in their research survey of co-production for community resilience. 

Twitter: Paloma Diaz @MPalomaD 

Ignacio Aedo @nachoodea

Photo: William Murphy/flickr/cc

facilitating online policy deliberation

September 8, 2016

Topic: Research

Facilitating online policy deliberation

Studies of facilitating online policy deliberation usually focus on participant perspectives. Dmitry Epstein and Gilly Leshed instead examine the role of the moderator in ‘The Magic Sauce: Practices of Facilitation in Online Policy Deliberation’, published in the Journal of Public Deliberation.

Epstein and Leshed consider the moderator or facilitators’ viewpoint in the context of the experimental civic engagement platform RegulationRoom,  a consultative space for public feedback on federal policy proposals. Developed by the Cornell eRulemaking Initiative (CeRI), RegulationRoom is designed to enable deliberative participation by citizens, and is stewarded by trained human facilitators. Epstein and Leshed interview RegulationRoom moderators for insights on their practices and their view of the participant community.

In their findings, Epstein and Leshed identify two types of primary activities as practiced by moderators. The first is focused on monitoring and managing the commentary to maintain quality of the discussion. The second type is focused on interacting directly with the participants to sustain and nurture meaningful contributions from the public into the policymaking process. While both activities aim to improve public commentary in the short term, tensions emerge when it comes to the long-term goal of improving broader participatory literacy. Epstein and Leshed examine their findings in light of this conflict, illustrating the tensions surrounding these goals by way of limitations and constraints, and offer a number of design recommendations.

Dmitry Epstein is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication, University of Illinois at Chicago, in addition to serving as Communication Officer and Program Committee member at the Steering Committee of the Global Internet Governance Academic Network (GigaNet). Gilly Leshed is Senior Lecturer and Director of the MPS Program in the Department of Information Science at Cornell University.

Twitter Dmitry Epstein: @Think_Macro

Photo: skitterphoto.com/cc

redesigning civic education and youth engagement

September 6, 2016

Topic: Features

Redesigning civic education and youth engagement

In ‘Redesigning Civic Education for the Digital Age: Participatory Politics and the Pursuit of Democratic Engagement’, Joseph Kahne, Erica Hodgin, and Elyse Eidman-Aadahl address transforming civic education to help youth respond effectively to the democratic opportunities and challenges presented by digital media. Published in Theory & Research in Social Education, the research analyses a nationally representative survey to understand new technology-driven practices in civic engagement, and explores a responsive curricular reform of civic education.

Joseph Kahne, Professor of Education at Mills College, Oakland, is also Chair of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP), in addition to being the Ted and Jo Dutton Presidential Professor for Education Policy and Politics at the University of California, Riverside. Erica Hodgin, Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Research Group at Mills College, is also the Research Director of the Educating for Participatory Politics project, attached to the MacArthur research network. Kahne and Hodgin are also Co-Principal Investigators at the Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age initiative, created in partnership with Oakland Unified School District and the National Writing Project. Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, Executive Director of the National Writing Project, founded NWP’s digital media and learning initiative Digital Is, in addition to co-creating the YOUmedia Learning Labs network, the Connected Learning Alliance, the Make to Learn Initiative.

In light of the major social transformations driven by new media and digital technology, and the socially responsive traditions of civic education, the research examines how civic and political engagement is manifested in the digital age and identifies the gaps in civic education practice. Kahne, Hodgin, and Eidman-Aadahl draw on the 2013 Youth and Participatory Politics (YPP) Survey, and look further to the Pew Internet and American Life Project surveys (2008, 2012). The authors identify major challenges to effective youth civic engagement, and discuss the democratic potential of curricular reform.

Twitter: @jkahne, @EricaHodgin, @ElyseEA

Photo: Fabrice Florin/flickr/cc

participatory budgeting in europe

August 30, 2016

Topic: Features

Participatory budgeting in Europe

Recently published, Participatory Budgeting in Europe: Democracy and public governance, is a comprehensive analysis of the practice of participatory budgeting across local governments in the European context. Through the study of a range of participatory budgeting experiments in over ten European countries, Yves Sintomer, Anja Rocke, and Carsten Herzberg explore the implications of participatory budgeting for democracy and governance, social justice, sustainable development and gender mainstreaming.

Widely translated, Yves Sintomer is a Professor of political science at Paris 8 University and Senior Fellow at the French University Institute.  Anja Rocke is Assistant Professor at the Department of Social Sciences, Humboldt University, Berlin, where she is Chair of General Socioloy. Carsten Herzberg is a researcher at the Nexus Institut, and has taught at the University of Potsdam, and the University of Applied Sciences (Berlin), among others. The research questions whether democratic innovations such as participatory budgeting can improve the effectiveness of public services for the stakeholder communities.

Participatory Budgeting in Europe illustrates the origins and emergence of the practice by detailing the pioneering decade of European participatory budgeting. It examines the results of such practices in the context of contemporary agendas and, at a theoretical level, the participatory model itself. Comparing of cases within Europe, it points to commonalities and divergences in the varying political cultures that have shaped these cases. This enables a discussion of the theories of participatory and deliberative democracy and articulates some of the conflicts prevalent between public systems and democratic practices.

Photo:Costa Constantinides/Flickr/cc

creating meaning public participation

August 26, 2016

Topic: Features

Creating meaning in public participation

Creating meaning in public participation is addressed by Kathryn S. Quick and John M. Bryson, who explore the theories and practice of participation in governance in Chapter 12 of Handbook on Theories of Governance, edited by Jacob Torbing and Chris Ansell.

Quick and Bryson highlight critical concerns in public participation theories and identify areas that demand further development. Key concerns examined include: the scope of meaningful participation; politics of representation, diversity and inclusion; the role of knowledge, and the alignment of contexts and methods. In addition, they explore the identification of suitable participation contexts and the complexities of diffuse governance systems.  

The research surveys the scholarly meaning and definition of public participation. It traces the evolution of the concept, the inherent and surrounding tensions, and illustrates the value that public participation brings to democratic theory and practice.  

Examining legitimacy as a key theme, Quick and Bryson evaluate a number of theoretical perspectives, including the quality of participatory exchange, the nature and impact of outcomes and the quality of process.  On diversity and inclusion, they analyse participatory processes for opportunities, barriers and limitations. Quick and Bryson also illustrate the tensions between expert and lay knowledge, in decision-making.   

This Chapter examines the challenges of creating meaningful participation processes pointing to the need for responsive, contextual practices. From a design science perspective, processes would need to be created based on evidence, context, and knowledge. Contextual factors that may shape participation include the nature and structure of government, social conditions, and various civil society dynamics.

Twitter: @kquickly

Photo: artefatica/Flickr/cc

hashtag twitter civic engagement

August 25, 2016

Topic: Features

Hashtags, Twitter and civic engagement

Alison N. Novak, Kristine Johnson, and Manuel Pontes examine how Latino communities use Twitter as a platform for civic and political engagement. Their article, ‘Latino Twitter: Discourses of Latino civic engagement in social media’, published recently in First Monday, offers a discourse analysis of the Latino population’s relationship with Twitter, focusing on the use of the #LatinoTwitter hashtag.

The research responds to the need for a greater understanding of how distinct communities use Twitter for civic engagement, given the platform’s significant role in contemporary popular and public discourse.  Novak, Johnson, and Pontes collected and analyzed Twitter data related to #LatinoTwitter, the most popular hashtag for the digital Latino community, from 2014-2016. Their study identified four discourses that emerged from the data set: racial positionality, social and civic purposes, information sharing, and promotion.

Tweets identified as a discourse of racial positionality offered expressions of identity, community, and culture, and countered mainstream representations. Posts that called for action and protest, or responded to rhetoric about the community were identified as discourse with social and civic purpose. The use of the #LatinoTwitter hashtag to circulate news and research on Latino experiences was recognized as a discourse of information sharing. The study also found a discourse of promotion, formed by user interactions or endorsements from and around celebrated Latino public figures.    

The patterns that emerge from the study demonstrate the diverse ways that members of the Latino community leverage Twitter to communicate identity, culture and politics. The responses to political systems, channels, and rhetoric in the data set point to the use of Twitter as a tool for change, participation, and strategic campaigning. Even as it calls for deeper explorations of community uses of Twitter, the study offers beginning evidence of how Twitter facilitates and contextualizes community communications – and discusses the implications for future research.  

Twitter: @AlisonNovak


Photo: longislandwins/Flickr/cc

public participation digital age

August 24, 2016

Topic: Features

Public participation in the digital age

Tina Nabatchi and Matt Leighninger offer a comprehensive exploration of public participation theory and practice in their new book, Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy.

Nabatchi, Associate Professor and Faculty Research Associate at the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PAARC), Maxwell School of Syracuse University, is also Co-Director at CNYSpeaks, a collaborative governance project. Leighninger, Director of the Yankelovich Center for Public Judgement, leads Public Engagement at Public Agenda, is a Senior Associate at Everyday Democracy, and serves on the boards of the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2USA), E-Democracy.org, The Democracy Imperative, and the Participatory Budgeting Project. The authors trace the emergence of public participation, its uses across sectors, and provide a framework and practical guidance for responsive citizen engagement for the digital civic sphere.  

The book offers a rich account of the conceptual and practical aspects of public participation, while also analysing contemporary challenges and reflecting on the possibilities for the future of public engagement. It traces an evolutionary journey for public engagement in the US, from its emergence in colonial democracy to the infrastructures of participation in use today, and the dynamics that continue to shape civic life in the digital age.

Nabatchi and Leighninger identify a distrustful disconnect between citizen and government that remains unaddressed by participatory infrastructures. They propose a number of reforms for participatory practice, including a six-point list of recommendations around communication, data collection, deliberation, decision making at scale, and nurturing civic engagement. They prescribe a number of tactical adjustments and systemic changes to fill the gaps in participatory practice.

Although their commentary invokes the enabling possibilities of technology, it also looks at contemporary experiments in democracy in the light of historical democratic landscapes. Packed with resources and case studies, particularly relevant to practitioners working in public engagement, the book is practice oriented, but also sketches an aspirational vision for public participation.

Twitter: @nabatchi
@mattleighninger

Photo:Christopher Allen/Flickr/cc

democracy digital technology

August 17, 2016

Topic: Features, United Kingdom

Democracy and digital technology: lessons after Brexit

Illustrating tensions between representative and direct democracy, Luciano Floridi’s recent articleTechnology and Democracy: Three Lessons from Brexit‘ suggests digital technologies will continue to shape a European future.

Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford, Director of Research, and Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute, Floridi is also Fellow of St Cross College, Distinguished Research Fellow at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, and Adjunct Professor (Department of Economics) at American University. In ‘Technology and Democracy’, published in Philosophy & Technology, Floridi reflects on the United Kingdom’s referendum to leave the European Union and dissects Brexit for insights on democracy and digital technologies.  He examines democratic theories and practices, the role of digital technologies in civic engagement, and the emerging challenges and possibilities arising from Brexit.

Floridi explores representative and direct democracy and how digital facilitation impacts citizen participation. As with the referendum, direct involvement can generate decisions that reflect popular will, leaving political and administrative actors to implement them. However, as Floridi points out, the reality of such a promise would not necessarily be ideal. Contrasting procedural (form-focused) and substantial (content-focused) interpretations of democracy, he offers an alternative interpretation that would offer a way of organizing power between those who hold, delegate, and exercise it.

Representative democracy, which separates sovereignty and governance, would seem less of a compromise and closer to an ideal. Floridi argues that the resilience of representative democracy offers greater protection against the misuse of power. He explores the limitations of direct democracy, and cautions against an idealistic view of its possibilities. In this light, the role of digital technologies, as enablers of greater participation in democracy, are vulnerable to populism and demagoguery, evident in the campaigns and narratives around Brexit.  As Floridi sees it, digital technologies will continue to play an important role in shaping the European project of the future.

Twitter: @Floridi

Photo: Tomek Nacho/Flickr/cc

participatory budgeting

August 16, 2016

Topic: Features, USA

Participatory budgeting: a comprehensive view

Widely published scholar and former White House policy advisor Hollie Russon Gilman conducts the first comprehensive academic exploration of participatory budgeting in the United States in Democracy Reinvented: Participatory Budgeting and Civic Innovation in America.

Currently a postdoctoral scholar at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), and a Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School, Georgetown University’s Beeck Center, and New America, Gilman has served as Open Government and Innovation Advisor at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Gilman’s Democracy Reinvented is a thorough academic examination of the challenges and opportunities afforded to contemporary democracy through the innovative civic practice of participatory budgeting.

Democracy Reinvented explores participatory budgeting in the context of larger conversations around democracy and its institutions in the United States, identifies the potential for inclusive governance and offers practical recommendations on leveraging digital and technological innovations towards achieving this end. Gilman uses field observations, interviews, survey research, etc., to generate a framework of assessment for such democraticexperiments by way of impact, efficacy and inclusiveness.   

As civic innovationparticipatory budgetings like participatory budgeting gain momentum in communities around the world, Gilman’s research seizes the opportunity to enrich the theory and practice of participatory democracy. It projects an alternative to the discourse of the disaffected citizen and mistrusted government by illustrating democratic innovations in practice, and compelling a re-imagination of the possibilities for civic engagement.  Apart from a deep and wide assessment of contemporary participatory budgeting, Gilman also explores pilot programs in government data transparency, crowdfunding for public policy making, and peer-to-peer microlending in different cities.

As the first in-depth academic treatise on participatory budgeting, Democracy Reinvented is a rich offering of rigorously gleaned insights  relevant to current and emerging understandings of citizenship and governance. It also addresses the dynamics that drive and shape digital civic engagement.

 

Twitter: @hrgilman

Photo: Costa Constantinides/Flickr/cc

community consultations in urban stormwater management

August 10, 2016

Topic: Australia, Features

Community consultations in urban stormwater management

Peter Dillon, Ron Bellchambers, Wayne Meyer, and Rod Ellis’s recent publication illustrates two successive but sharply contrasting community consultation initiatives for an urban storm water management plan for Brown Hill Creek, South Australia. The article, Community Perspective on Consultation on Urban Stormwater Management: Lessons from Brownhill Creek, South Australiawhich appeared in the journal Waterprovides an analytical account of community consultation efforts toward a water management plan and is informed by the perspective of a participating community environmental and heritage conservation group. 

The project is a collaboration between Adelaide, Burnside, Mitcham, Unley, and West Torrens councils. Drawing on the participatory experiences of the Brownhill Creek Association, the plan was conceived to reduce vulnerability to flood events within the catchment and is now operationalized in the Brown Hill Keswick Creek Stormwater Project.  The article provides an institutional and geographic background to the case, describes the consultation domains involved, and analyses the local political processes that played a role in the progress and outcome of the consultations.  

The draft plan presented to community members at the first public consultation was met with dissenting feedback, as the options presented to the residents were effectively limited to either constructing a dam or risking floods. Residents were compelled to form an action group against the dam on environmental grounds, and further, stall decision-making on the plan. The second consultation engaged more effectively with local stakeholders, including those with opposing or varying stances, to generate a publicly supported, viable, environmentally sound alternative that not only met the objectives of the project, but also saved public money.

Dillon et al. note that the second consultation was benefited by improved process rigor and – significantly – openness in dealing with all affected stakeholders so that community members could feel assured that their concerns had been taken into account. The research locates the consultations on the IAP2 Public Participation Spectrum, and offers a number of important takeaways for practitioners involved with new water management projects.   

 

Photo:Michael Coghlan/Flickr.com/cc

human-centred design

August 9, 2016

Topic: Features

Human-centric governance: behaviour-based design in Finland

Design for Government: Human-centric governance through experiments is a translation of an original report on the Design for Government project, commissioned by the Prime Minister’s Office of Finland. The project was executed by the think tank Demos Helsinki in partnership with Avanto Helsinki and the Department of Design at Aalto University.

Prepared and written by Mikko Annala, Tuuli Kaskinen, Seungho Lee, Juha Leppänen, Kalle Mattila, Aleksi Neuvonen, Johannes Nuutinen, Eevi Saarikoski and Antti Tarvainen, in collaboration with Antti Hautamäki and Tuuli Mattelmäki, the project constructs a framework for operationalizing behavior and evidence-based policy approaches for the Finnish government. In its first phase, it created a comprehensive benchmark of best practices informed by international experts and regional stakeholders.  In its second phase, the project fed and drew from the Design for Government course at Aalto University, where it invited students and participants to engage with the Finnish government’s current challenges.  The outcome was an operating model for applying these methods to the planning of governmental steering.

The operating model proposed by the report is designed to improve steering mechanisms, enable successful collaborations with citizens and nurture best practices. It also aims to enrich public sector competence in the implementation and assessment of such methods. Additionally, it hopes to enhance innovative cooperation between the governmental stakeholders involved, and drive change in the existing planning and steering culture towards a more open, citizen-oriented approach.  

Chapter 3 recommended the embedding of a two-year behavior-based experimental system into the government’s incumbent plan, with the intention of creating a development process for governmental steering mechanisms shaped by behavior-based knowledge. In a foreword to the paper, Sirpa Kekkonen, Head of the Secretariat for Government Strategy Work, confirms that the project has inspired and informed the Finnish government’s efforts towards nurturing an experimentation culture for public policy.

 

Photo: Willowbloo/wikimedia commons/cc

inclusive cities

August 4, 2016

Topic: Features

Inclusive cities: planning for intercultural communities

In their recent article, Inclusive Cities for Intercultural Communities. European Experiences, Gabriella Esposito De Vita Stefania Oppido investigate the relationship between cities and citizens affected by migration. It explores the role that spatial, social, and economic bodies could play in building inclusive cities.

Published in the journal Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, and presented  through the 2nd ‘New Metropolitan Perspectives’ International Symposium,the paper evaluates local initiatives of select cities and illustrates the challenges faced by their communities in the context of urban policy and intercultural integration. The research case studies include investigations of a number of initiatives from Italy and other European countries; from migrant-rich urban areas to peripheral and historical neighbourhoods.  The inclusion of these case studies illustrates the relationship between new social structures of the city to the need to reconfigure spaces, functions and services to cater adequately to citizen requirements. The case studies are compared through keywords, period and scale of intervention, stakeholders, urban and social contexts, findings, dissemination tools and the use of participatory processes.   

Research findings point to the compelling demand for addressing the needs of local citizens and migrants – and to reflect urban diversity and create equity in the urban context. Through evidence from the case studies, the authors emphasize a number of strengths that could enhance local urban diversity management: support networks, collaborative and participatory means to enrich bottom-up processes, intercultural engagement to identify solutions to collective problems, peer-enabled mediation services for migrants, and the leveraging of multimedia. 

The study finds that the inclusive city nurtures social cohesion by enabling interaction between the various cultural groups and offers a number of recommendations for policy, administration, and planning practitioners focused on multicultural communities. 

Photo: Michael Coghlan/Flickr/cc

educating youth for online civic engagement

August 3, 2016

Topic: Features

Educating youth for online civic engagement

Erica Hodgin‘s Educating Youth for Online Civic and Political Dialogue: A Conceptual Framework for the Digital Age examines digital affordances, challenges, and learning opportunities for youth participation in civic dialogue.

Associate Director of the Civic Engagement Research Group, attached to Mills College, Hodgin is Research Director at the Educating for Participatory Politics project, supported by the MacArthur Foundation. Her article – published in the Journal of Digital and Media Literacy – draws from the activities of four high school teachers on a participatory academic platform to illustrate five stages of opportunity that nurture youth civic engagement – and engages with the challenges faced by the teachers.  The research uses these opportunities and challenges to generate a conceptual framework for education practitioners and policymakers.

Hodgin’s new research recognizes that digital civic participation can be shaped by such dynamics as access, literacy, technological affordances, supports gaps – and that digital civic learning opportunities needs to be equitable. Three of the teachers in the study were involved with Educating for Democracy in the Digital Age (EDDA), a digital civics initiative enabled by the Oakland Unified Schools District (OUSD), the National Writing Project (NWP), and Mills College. The fourth teacher connected with the group through Youth Voices, an educational social network platform and dialogic community. Apart from teacher interviews, the study also employed student interviews, classroom observations, and a focus group.

On analysis of the sample group’s experiences on the Youth Voices platform, the research finds five opportunities that build on each other. The initial step for students was to join an online dialogic community where, as a next step, they could safely and meaningfully navigate diverse perspectives and gain a multi-faceted understanding of civic issues. Then, students could engage in productive and respectful civic dialogue to practice meaningful conversational strategies. The next stage of opportunity would involve publishing and defending their reflections, and finally, leveraging media to create change. The research identifies the following challenges: maintaining the quality of discourse, time and space limitations, and access to the digital technologies and literacies for online dialogue. To conclude, Hodgin discusses the implications and offers recommendations to close the support gap for productive and equitable participatory opportunities.

Twitter: @EricaHodgin

 

Photo: David Shankbone/Flickr/cc

participatory politics and youth civic engagement

July 27, 2016

Topic: Features

Participatory politics and youth civic engagement

Award-winning writer, Research Director and Senior Producer at Youth RadioElisabeth Soep’s new book, Participatory Politics: Next-Generation Tactics to Remake Public Spheres explores youth civic engagement across digital and face-to-face contexts.

Soep examines new ways youth are engaging in civic life, both online and offline. She offers insights on next-generation tactics for civic participation, particularly useful to practitioners and researchers involved with digital citizen engagement practices. Within her research, she dissects a variety of cases where youth merge cultural and political articulations to engage with civic issues in innovative ways, and illustrates that youth are increasingly involved with the production of media and culture that engages with civic questions.

Exploring participatory activities across the sharing of information, dialogic conversations, content creation, public interest investigation, and grassroots mobilization, she draws from existing literature and her findings to identify five tactics to nurture youth civic engagement. These tactics are broadly built around mobilization, storytelling, leveraging public data, leveraging digital capabilities, and managing visibility.  Soep then examines the literacy that these new participatory forms demand, and the consequent risks, in particular, risks around the questions of simplification, sensationalization, slippage, unsustainability, and saviorism.

Participatory Politics  points to a repeatedly articulated mistrust in institutions and processes of policymaking. It explores three broad areas: the nature of youth participatory tactics; possibilities for improving the quality and impact of these methods; and, ways for participatory opportunities to be more inclusive.

Soep illustrates the ways in which interrelated tactics, risks, and literacies shape youth participation in the digital age. Her research observes that changes to communication structures and hierarchies have opened up new possibilities for the finding, sharing and analysis of information – and consequently, new conditions and opportunities for dialogue and participation.

 

Photo: Backbone Campaign/flickr.com/cc

engaging healthcare for Aboriginal Australians

Topic: Features

Engaging healthcare for Aboriginal Australians

Angela Durey et al. recently published ‘Improving healthcare for Aboriginal Australians through effective engagement between community and health services,’ an assessment of a community engagement strategy between health providers and Aboriginal communities across five southern districts of Perth, Western Australia.

Angela Durey, Suzanne McEvoy, Val Swift-Otero, Kate Taylor, Judith Katzenellenbogen and Dawn Bessarab of Curtin University present an assessment of a community engagement strategy between health providers of the South Metropolitan Health Service under the Department of Health, Western Australia, and Aboriginal communities. The strategy enabled District Aboriginal Health Action Groups (DAHAGs), implemented by the South Metropolitan Public Health Unit’s Aboriginal Health Team, to partner with local service providers on culturally responsive health care services. Durey, et al. appraise the strategy for effectiveness and identify the success factors. They assess the process for how it captures a range of community perspectives on health service needs, and ask if Aboriginal participants’ expectations of the process were met. Further, the evaluation looks at the implementation of the participants’ recommendations and whether – consequently – this improved Aboriginal community access to local health services.

The evaluation involved participants from four stakeholder groups across five districts: Aboriginal DAHAG members who used Aboriginal and mainstream health services, Health Providers of Aboriginal Services (HPAS) who delivered services to local Aboriginal people, Aboriginal Specific Service Users (ASSU) who were members of the local Aboriginal community but not of DAHAG, and Mainstream Health Service Providers (MHSP) who were members of services that took part in DAHAG engagements. Data was collected through one-to-one interviews and yarning circles (narrative, Indigenous, culture-appropriate methodology that is safe and credible for qualitative research in Indigenous communities).  Two-way accountability procedures were established, for both health service providers and community.     

The Indigenous context for evaluation design was conscious of the work of Maori researcher Linda Tuhiwai Smith. Key themes that emerge from the evaluation indicate that, despite their initial skepticism, participants across the stakeholder groups feel that the strategy was effective, with recommendations translated into action, stronger relationships between service providers and community, and improvement in culturally appropriate health services. The engagement also seems to have positively impacted local Aboriginal community trust in, and access to, these services. The evaluation locates its findings in the broader contexts and literature on partnerships with Aboriginal communities, and identifies concerns for sustainable community engagement.  

building new york public library's community oral history project

July 13, 2016

Topic: Features, USA

Building New York Public Library’s Community Oral History Project

Kate Cordes, Assistant Director of Maps, Local History, and Genealogy at The New York Public Library (NYPL) recently published Together We Listen: Generating Accessible Oral Histories of NYC through Community Participatory Projects, a descriptive overview of the origins, processes, and progress of the NYPL’s Community Oral History Project.

NYPL has mobilized local communities and stakeholders in an ongoing attempt to create one of the city’s richest collections of oral histories. The Community Oral History Project has given rise to Together We Listen, an accessible repository of unique personal accounts of city life from the mid-20th century to the present. Apart from being a celebration of community history and a valuable addition to existing historical records, it is also part of a broader attempt to nurture and grow community engagement at local libraries.

Launched in 2013, the Community Oral History Project is a convergence of community participation, crowdsourcing and the capabilities of a number of branches and research divisions of the library. The project trains local volunteers to interview residents on their experiences of their neighborhood’s history, people, and places. These collected local memories are then digitally archived and made accessible as part of the local history collection of the research library. The Library created a crowdsourced transcription verification tool, which further allows a thorough exploration of the interviews. The project uses social media platforms to share the resources, spread word of the project, and encourage and sustain participation from local stakeholders.

Cordes’ paper provides a context to the project by way of the broader role and objectives of the NYPL in the community. It also highlights the departments and divisions that have stewarded the project, and the ways in which these stakeholders have both enriched and benefited from the project. Cordes outlines the execution of the project in a stage-by-stage breakdown of the planning and implementation, including challenges and opportunities that have unfolded throughout these stages. The paper illustrates a working example of a collaborative effort built across community, institution, and shared knowledge, enabled by digital technology.   

 

Photo: Alex Proimos/Flickr/CC